Friday, October 07, 2005

Blogs Creativity ESP-Disk



Blogs. Creativity. ESP-Disk.

Blog core value #6 is "Creativity".

An effective blogging consists of using your imagination, exhibiting your unique personal flair and sense of style, in your blog's content and design.



How creative is your blog?

Are you creative?



Most people are, if they try and practice and learn.



"Creativity" DEFINED

Creativity is mostly just well orchestrated Change:



turning things



* inside out

*upside down



* larger to gigantic



* reduce to tiny

* to stripped minimalism or complex embellishment

* other, better, nicer, easier, faster, safer, cheaper, richer. Sleeker. Bulkier. Faster and brighter. Easier and stronger. More organized. Sharper focus.



Creativity is also mixing, listing, or sequencing things in a new and improved order.



Or juxtaposing two unexpected things, for shock effect or to illustrate a complex idea.



Applied Creativity, the finished product, should ideally be beneficial to users, easy to interact with, and ultimately satisfying, stimulating, inspiring both praise and progress.



My favorite art is whatever is benevolent and astonishing.

EXAMPLE in MUSIC



When I was very young, I discovered ESP-Disk records.


http://www.espdisk.com













This obscure little New York label had a catalog me and my friend Bennett Theissen carried around with us like some people carry around Proust, Joyce, or Dickens.



We ordered a large number of ESP-Disk records through their catalog or asked another friend, who worked at Byerly Music downtown, to order them through the store.





To us, it was as if the recordings were from Mars or Alpha Centauri.


Every ESP-Disk recording we were able to obtain contained highly unusual, extremely experimental music that fit right in with the other music we were listening to: Leonard Cohen, Silver Apples, The Incredible String Band, Dick Hyman (moog), Wild Man Fischer, Captain Beefheart, Moondog, 50 Foot Hose, Mad River, Morton Subotnick, and Everything is Everything.



It was exciting, underground music was ringing triumphantly in our ears, and the whole private experience was a distant, exotic, esoteric artistic world.







It transmitted an extraordinary feeling that hooked you through the sounds of the records and through the album cover artwork.







A web site devoted to preserving the historical significance of ESP-Disk gives the following description of a creative music album concept...

[QUOTE]

LP, 1974, 290 West End address. This LP comes in a plain solid black sleeve (kinda like spinal tap) and it comes with stickers inside so you can design the cover yourself.



It comes with a yellow arrow sticker that says the album title on it. A red and a green center LP label (vinyl labels come blank too) and an orange sticker with all the album info on it. This was later re-issued as "Godz Bless California".

[END QUOTE]



I notice how this band was letting the fans interact with the recorded album packaging, enabling them to choose elements and make their own distinct version of the musical project. The users, listeners, customers could impose their own creativity upon the product. The band empowered their fans and honored them, even if it may seem trivial. It was unique.




Another landmark album cover innovation was seen in an LP by the punk band the Violators: the album featured large squares of sandpaper glued to both sides of the cover. When you slid it in and out of your record collection, this album would scratch and destroy the other albums it rubbed against.








[signed] Steven Streight aka Vaspers the Grate

:*)

5 comments:

carrie said...

i like the layout of this post.

Guillermo said...

Another landmark album cover innovation was seen in an LP by the punk band the Violators: the album featured large squares of sandpaper glued to both sides of the cover. When you slid it in and out of your record collection, this album would scratch and destroy the other albums it rubbed against.
Which idea was ripped off from the Manchester (UK not Mass.) band Durruti Column whose manager (Tony Wilson) ripped off from a paperback published by a Situationist writer/artist (I think maybe Asger Jorn - though I'm probably wrong) and whose band name refers to one of the many heroic militias of the Spanish Revolution of 1936.

steven edward streight said...

I know the Durruti Column, which was one man, and had some albums by him.

I'm not sure if the Violators did it before Durruti Column or not.

guillermo said...

The man was (is still) Vinny Riley. I think other members of the band would query whether it was just one man or not!
What do you think of the Aussie band The Necks? I really would like to know.
¡Salud!

steven edward streight said...

I've been a one man band with other anti-musicians joining me and I was still a one man band, just with extras milling about on stage and in studios.

The Necks? Never heard. Any free downloads of their material available?

I'm really pleased with Deerhoof, which is members of Caroliner, the band Alex Ross, The New Yorker music critic, says is the strangest of the San Fransisco underground bands.

Deerhoof is like early Jethro Tull with Stereolab-like vocals, flutes, hard guitar like The Homosexuals, but with that medieval quality exploited in Caroliner, songs about halfrabbit/halfdog, sewing, planting, serf music, y'know?

http://deerhoof.killrockstars.com

http://puzzle.suchfun.net/deerhoof

:*)